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When The State Breaks A Man

June 19, 2011

Grigg politely sidesteps addressing the role of the women and feminism in all this.

Thomas Ball, like millions of others, learned that the people who choose this profession have an unfailing ability to exploit even the tiniest opportunity to invade a home and destroy a family.

One evening in April 2001, Mr. Ball suffered a momentary lapse of patience with a disobedient four-year-old daughter and slapped her face. He left the house at his wife’s suggestion. When he called her a short time later, he learned that his wife — “the type that believes that people in authority actually know what they are talking about” — had called the police, who told her that her “abusive” husband wasn’t permitted to sleep in his own home that night. Ball was arrested at work the following day. Under the conditions of his bail, he wasn’t allowed to ask his wife what had possessed her to call the police.

Years later Ball would learn that if his wife hadn’t called the police and accused her husband of abuse, she would have been arrested as an accessory — leaving the children at the mercy of New Hampshire’s utterly despicable Division of Children, Youth, and
Families
(DCYF).

Dot Knightly, who tried vainly for years to win custody of three grandchildren seized on the basis of spurious abuse and neglect accusations, recounts how a DCYF commissar contemptuously batted away both her pleas and her abundant qualifications to serve as a custodial caretaker: “Nobody gets their kids back in New Hampshire. The government gives us the power to decide how these cases turn out.
Everyone who fights us loses.”

Despairing over being wrested away from everyone he loved, Dot’s grade-school age grandson Austin — who had literally been dragged screaming from his grandparents’ home — tried to commit suicide. This led to confinement in a psychiatric hospital and involuntary “treatment” with mind-destroying psychotropic drugs. For New Hampshire’s child-snatchers, the phrase “nobody gets their kids back” translates into a willingness to destroy the captive children by degrees, rather than allow any successful challenge to their supposed authority.

The instant the police intervened in the domestic affairs of Thomas Ball’s household, his family’s destruction became inevitable. The officers were required — not by law, but by official policy that followed profit incentives created by Washington — to make an arrest. In a similar fashion, and for the same reason, prosecutors are forbidden to drop domestic abuse cases under any circumstances.

Ball recalled that he was eventually found not guilty, much to the visible disgust of the be-robed dispenser of official injustice who presided at the trial. But this made no material difference: His wife — who divorced him six months after his arrest — was now a consort of the State, his children were its property. His innocence notwithstanding, Ball was given an open-ended sentence of serfdom — and the prospect of being sent to debtor’s prison — through government-mandated “child support” system. Furthermore, he wasn’t permitted to see his children, despite the fact that a jury had found him innocent.

http://freedominourtime.blogspot.com/2011/06/when-state-breaks-man.html

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